Magazine Round Up: The Ideas that Shape and Inspire on the Printed Page

Though magazines aren’t as instant as social media, it is impossible to stay on top of every article posted at all hours of the day. Plus, who doesn’t love getting mail?! Each month, I save the magazines that come in for an empty weeknight or weekend morning. I enjoy having a few hours to pour through the pages and think about the ideas shared. Self-education and continuous learning are important, not just for the joy of reading or escaping boredom. Learning more allows us to think with more dimension and color, and make connections we previously couldn’t see. It allows us, as you’ll read below, to solve old problems in new ways and new problems in creative ways.

Here are some highlights of what I’ve read in two recent issues!

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From Inc., March/April 2018 issue.

  • Page 18: “The Future and the Farm” – One area identified by author Lauren Barack that was underhyped, but with related excitement about the area, was security. Digital security and physical security are both important because without them functioning well, there is fear amongst us normal folks and specialists alike. We have to be careful about the perception of security, and balance the need for privacy and safety with community and ease of use.
  • Page 26: “Rising and Grinding with Daymond John” – I love the approach to goal setting Daymond John has, and not just related to setting the action and timelines for the goals. He themes his goals around areas of life that are most important to him, and he reads them twice a day as a reminder, no matter how long range or immediate they might be. He understands the impact his goals have on other people, and this is probably one of the mindsets that has led to his success.
  • Page 36:  “Here’s a Crazy Idea for Startups: Profits” – This article focuses on the concepts of business sustainability, rather than how the founders exit and get paid. It seems like a smarter business ideal, smarter investment approach, and a better way to treat customers and employees.
  • Page 42: “Keeping Your Workers Well” – “…18 percent of American adults suffer from some form of mental illness, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.” This is a staggering statistic that shows we need to do a better job taking care of ourselves and helping others care for themselves also. Treating mental health issues before they hurt who they afflict can impact business productivity, but we have to remove the stigma.

 

From Entrepreneur, April 2018 issue

I may not own a company, but I find the articles to be relevant to work and my interests and the intersection of both of those. Occasionally, we need to change our perspective and the way we think to implement new ways of doing things.

  • Page 22: “Always Serve Your Customer” – Having customers provides the ability for a business to exist, but the company has to pay attention for how they treat their customers! Investment in this area is crucial. Author Boyd Farrow quotes expert Maryli Karske on the fact that good service follows satisfied employees.
    • Personal note: my husband recently had a third-in-a-row bad experience as a newly opened sweetgreen near our home. We submitted a complaint about inventory and customer service. The customer rep responded in a way we couldn’t imagine (in under an hour to an online form!), explaining the actions the company would take to make sure this didn’t happen again. Not only were we heard and received a response, but I was given three options on how I would reward the employee for five-star service. How cool is that!
  • Page 30: “90 Meetings in 90 Days” – Stephanie Schomer highlights the efforts RubiconMD founders Gil Addo and Carlos Reines made to learn about the applicability of their idea to potential markets and customers. The results were surprising! This is a great indicator of the importance of socializing our ideas, asking questions, and understanding the problems that people may not be able to define, but need solved. It was a short but inspiring article reminding us that business is more personal than we let ourselves remember.
  • Page 42: “When Disaster Strikes, Can Entrepreneurship Save Us?” – Hurricane Maria left island nations and Puerto Rico in ruins, without communication or power. Entrepreneur Jesse Levin traveled to understand the biggest issues impacting those on the island. Simply communicating and asking questions led to executable solutions to help large groups of Puerto Ricans – a $33K investment led to $3M in grocery transactions to feed the hungry island residents. The article goes on to detail what is referred to as “expeditionary entrepreneurship” and the resolve and creativity of many Puerto Ricans, working together to build each other and their communities back up.
    • Personal note: The story notes that Levin hopes to focus on emergency preparedness, rather than disaster response. There is so much sex appeal around building new versus taking care of what we have. We NEED, as a society, to take care of what we build. Whether your home, the local school, the state bridge, or the federal highway. Infrastructure investment is essential and forgotten by our government officials, and even regulated and quasi public industries like utilities for water, wastewater, and power.

 

Which topics resonate the most with you? What new ideas are you thinking of after reading about what others are doing? Are any inspiring to you?

The Top Reads of 2017 in the Second Half

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Earlier this year I set myself a goal of reading 35 books. Given that I read only 11 in 2016, it seemed like an audacious goal, but attainable and worth striving for. Reading for me encompasses many needs and desires. In almost every situation, reading opens my mind in new ways, to new possibilities, no matter if fiction or nonfiction. I feel more creative, or develop skills, or end up laughing. All things I desire in life!

I not only met my goal of reading 35 books, I smashed it! The total as of today is 41, an increase of 17% over the goal! The goal was certainly helped by some books that were not only shorter than most, but also more of a booklet than you would consider a typical book.

Everything I read was on an e-reader (I use the Kindle, but ‘m sure you can find one you like!) and for me it made everything a million times easier because I knew it fit in every bag I use on a day to day basis. That made it easy to carry, and the sales on ebooks tend to result in a lower price, so it is more affordable and easier to buy more over the course of a year. Even if the average price was $5 for an ebook (and this feels high to me for what I actually spent), it compares to a typical $15 I might spend to purchase (non fiction) paperbacks and $25 that I might spend on hardcovers, which is rare. Over the total of all books, I spent $205 and saved $410 versus all paperback and $820 versus completely hardcover. Those savings are not small numbers! Of course, the library is cheaper than spending any money at all.

Since I shared my favorite books in the first half of the year, I thought I would share my best reads over the last six months. The books I read and found worth sharing are below, in no particular order.

Beyond the Label, by Maureen Chiquet: The former CEO of Chanel shared her career path and lessons learned in both the office and at home. She is a compelling storyteller and shares some good advice applicable to anyone. I’m not a lover of fashion and still found this book quite relevant. You feel like you are in the room during certain stories, because the people and situations are so well described. There were a few moments where I found myself wondering how she balanced everything going on, and Ms. Chiquet described several times when she was working through the imbalance of being not just an executive, but a person.

A Path Appears, by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn: This was part of the Alpha Gamma Delta book club and was perhaps the most insightful, eye-opening read in the past six months. The authors take a detailed look at what makes service, volunteerism, and most especially charitable giving work best. They encourage research and more attention to decision making, and highlight a number of causes that either haven’t worked well or have worked tremendously. While the authors stop short of promoting which specific charities you should support (they do highlight some high-performers), they note some objectives we should think through and work with what is most important to the individual donor. The important thing is to do what you are able to do to help! Anything is better than sitting back.

The Little Book of Hygge, by Meik Wiking: Knowing quite little about the Danish culture, this book was not only a great primer but a window into the lifestyle of what makes the Danes tick. I was enamored of the concept of Hygge (“hig-eh”) and would love to create a version of it in my own life – surround myself with good people, good lighting, good design, comfy clothes, and enjoy the outdoors when possible! This is a simplistic summary, as there are recipes and stories and details that make the “Danish secrets to happy living” meaningful to those of us outside Denmark.

How to be an Imperfectionist, by Stephen Guise: As a recovering perfectionist, this book was a great read because it captures everything I am missing about previous and current efforts, actively trying to not be perfect. The author stresses the importance of imperfection to anything, along the lines that any action yields us results that lead to success in some variation. Don’t let yourself be paralyzed by perfection – life is better when imperfect!

Multipliers, by Liz Wiseman: This book is notable because it forced me to confront the fact that I still have to learn about and improve upon my leadership style. Everyone who reads it wants to identify as a Multiplier, but there are aspects of the Diminisher and Accidental Diminisher that seem to haunt all of us in one way or another until we take action to correct over the long term. Being that uncomfortable from self reflection and taking the hit to the confidence is not something I necessarily aspire to, but I do aspire to be an impactful leader. This book encourages honest reflection and provides the insight needed to make the improvements.

The Crossroads of Should and Must, by Elle Luna: This was the shortest book I read all year, and did so in an entire sitting of waiting for a doctor’s appointment that was running behind. The illustrations were what really made the discussion of considering a “should” versus a “must” and which makes the most sense for your life and what you want for your personal outcome.

In Praise of Slowness, by Carl Honoré: This book impacted me so much I wrote a blog post earlier this year on it – check it out to see what it exposed me to and what my reactions and life benefits were!

The two books I was reading at the time of the posting of my mid year were put on hold so I could truly focus on them for a couple hours at a time. The Joanna Barsh book on Centered Leadership needs attention because of what look to be impactful introspective activities. That may be a good, low-key weekend activity and read.

I’ve already downloaded a half dozen books for next reading, and the genres are all over the map. Winter is a great time to cozy up with a tea or hot chocolate, maybe a soft blanket or a cuddly puppy, and a book or device that emulates a book, and escape reality. Maybe we learn ways to improve and gain inspiration for setting new goals, and perhaps we just gain a few minutes of peace. Whatever joy reading brings you, may you feel much of that joy this season in all areas of your life!

Experiencing the Joys of Vacation, and What is in it For You!

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“I can hear you smiling!” My VP laughed through the phone to me. It was my first day back from vacation last week, and I felt great. I was smiling, and I was eager to jump back into work. Energy and enthusiasm radiated from me. In my current role, I enjoy coming in to do my work every day, but coming back from a week in Ireland with my husband I was kinetic. A week spent exploring the entire country of Ireland left me feeling only physically exhausted and on an emotional high.

Passing through the countryside with the stone walls and fields filled with sheep, and into the towns with the Christmas decorations lighting up the quaint yet lively streets, we drove about 1,000 kilometers (or roughly 620 miles) on the left side of the road (okay, my husband did all the driving!). While we paid in Euros and snacked on Dairy Milk, we found the best seafood chowder (Cronin’s in Killarney) and best fish and chips (The Lemon Tree in Blarney, right across from the Castle). We discovered Galway Bay Brewery for the first time, that Guinness does taste different in Ireland (I found it slightly sweeter/less bitter), and that Jameson’s Irish whiskey triple distillation is what makes a difference in the flavor. The Cliffs of Moher are more majestic than any photo or video can document – the colors are more vivid, the wind is fresh in feel and smell, and the mist makes it an iconic Irish experience. Dublin reminded us of Boston at home, but much more old worldly in all of the best ways. Each night we were drained from our adventures, but we slept well and woke up refreshed and with anticipation of what fun was to come that day. We fit a lot into a small time frame, and will definitely be back.

Upon return, I didn’t expect this feeling of relaxation. In my entire career, I had only taken two other week-long-plus vacations – one to Cape Cod where I felt like I had to check in everyday via email, and the other was my honeymoon to Costa Rica. The first versus the last two was a drastically different experience. I was stressed, even as I was at the beach and feeling the ocean breeze. The emails I read through in the morning kept piling up and stayed in my mind as a reminder of all that I was missing and how far behind I would be when I came back. For Costa Rica and Ireland, I changed my behavior and was happy to have the support from work to truly separate.

If you have the means to travel, by all mean, get out and get away. Explore a different corner of your country or the world. If travel funds are tight or non-existent, try new corners of your town or a short drive to one you haven’t been to. Growing up, my dad and grandfather would pack my siblings and I into the car and take us out on adventures. It might have been the Quabbin Reservoir, touring a college campus, a free sporting event, a shopping trip to BJ’s, or visits to family in neighboring towns, and not only was it a chance to give my mom some “me time” after dealing with three wild children the whole week, but we all learned more about where we were from. The connections you make with people are even more important than the connections you make with the new places you visit. Take a friend or cousin or parent with you. Build stronger bonds, whether it is your hometown or a new town. Feeling connected with the ones you love makes you ready and more engaged for when you reconnect with work.

Being that ready and engaged meant eliminating work stress and creating a feeling of being refreshed. A successful vacation is one where you are relaxed and fulfilled. This takes intentional action, and there are some practices that can help make a difference.

  1. Completely ignoring work email – truly being out of office! Take the app off your phone if that helps you stay true.
  2. Setting up contacts for while I was out – this allowed work to continue in my absence since someone else could answer any questions.
  3. Plan activities that help you separate from what is normal – outdoors, dancing, at the beach, or the mountains. Use a different part of your brain.
  4. Get out and explore. Maybe you don’t plan every moment, but go on a journey (a walk across town, or a flight across the world) that not only separates, but opens your eyes to wonder and possibility.
  5. Connect with people you care about. I spent time with my husband, maybe you want to see your parents or an old college roommate or your best group of girl friends.

You might have heard the benefits of taking a vacation, and they bear repeating. Do not ignore these – take them to heart!

  1. Stress reduction
  2. Increased productivity
  3. Intentional connection with loved ones
  4. Feeling Happier

With the holidays and New Year upon us, the end of the year is a great time to use your vacation time. Here are some reasons why:

  1. Your vacation may not carry over until the next year.
  2. Your personal life is busy, and you need time to get all of the personal things done
  3. You need a mental health day, either just because, or because you’re hosting the whole family
  4. Your spouse or kids or friends or nieces/nephews are off of school for the week and it would be great to spend time with them
  5. Take time to reflect heading into the new year – set goals and decide where you want to take yourself moving forward
  6. You’ve worked hard and flat out deserve a break!
  7. Seemingly everyone is taking time off, so no one is answering their phones or emails, preventing you from making much progress.

Take time for you. Your work, your loved ones, and especially YOU will be better off for it. I highly recommend going to Ireland if you are interested and have the time and funds because it was majestic and pictures don’t do the experience justice. Go live life. The work will be there when you return. Take your vacation, and take all of it!

Why Friends are Important to Our Careers

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This time last week, I was in Minnesota with three amazing friends for a weekend getaway. The day before we had re-united, exploring Minneapolis at the sculpture park and watching the magnificence of the Mississippi River and the beauty of nature in the city alongside it. As overscheduled and overcommitted people, we try to catch up when we can, but with time differences, work travel, long days, and personal responsibilities, it is hard to get more than a few texts in even if two of us live twenty minutes away from each other.

Sunday night I returned home, exhausted from the weekend. It was a happy, punchy exhausted – tired from too many laughs, heart to hearts, and deep questions leading to thoughtful and even deeper conversations. My happiness bucket was filled in a way only time with amazing friends can do.  Getting away and focusing on each other and celebrating our friendship had long lasting effects this week, including decreased stress levels from remembering the funniest moments.

Monday morning back at work, despite a shorter night’s sleep than I would normally like to start the week, I noticed I was more focused than usual. I was buoyant, almost, able to face any challenge. I was ready to take on the day and whatever came my way. What a surprising reaction! But in all actuality, it isn’t. Friendship is critically important not only in our lives, but in a more focused way, also on our careers. From support to revelry and everything in between, friends are there for us. It may be next door, across town, a state away or across the country or world, but a phone call or text or email with a word of encouragement can be exactly what we need. And who knows what we need even just as well as we do than our friends?

There are two primary types of friends related to your career: life friends and work friends. Both types of these friends have benefits, but not one hundred percent with upside. I tend to find that life friends provide greater value and benefit than work friends. The expanse of topics you can cover is almost endless – you’re only limited by the amount of privacy you and your friends like to have in their lives. Conversations with my friends related to work open up topics I’d never think to broach with work friends, including pay equity, harassment, and ambition. The answers are honest and may come with advice from lessons learned the hard way.

The better opportunity than even having work friends goes straight back to mentorship and sponsorship. The benefits of these kind of relationships are all over the internet, so I won’t rehash them, but it is something you should pursue if the opportunity arises. Each of friends, mentors, and sponsors all bring office politics into play, but mentors and sponsors are the only way to truly rise above it. Unless you are friends at work with others who yield greater influence, it is likely that you need to recuse yourself from certain discussions or avoid taking sides so that

Sometimes I find that my “life friends” are my best career mentors, even as peers and in different industries. There are some truths and situations that are consistent no matter what you do for a career, from bad bosses to good bosses and finding new jobs to gunning for promotions. The politics may be different between organizations, but the talks I’ve had with my friends are comforting – I might be taking the best action I can, the gaffe was not as bad as I worked it up to be, or they struggled with the same thing and here is how this friend addressed it. They’ve also been a wake up call, that maybe I do need a change or to work harder or re-think my attitude. We’ve focused on the positive, dwelled on the negative, and always look for the opportunity in any situation for not only ourselves, but each other. Sometimes a friend is simply a listening ear – and this is less simple than you would think to be an engaged, active, supportive listener! In the past, a friend has been even more incredulous about a scenario than I was, and that is empowering to me to step up and take action or recognize worth or feelings.

Friends care about our feelings and well being, and look at us as a whole person and not just an employee. This makes a considerable difference as to what we can attain in our lives personally, and not just professionally. Whether it is seeking happiness or love or health, we sometimes need to remember that it isn’t all about work and that we are whole people. It takes someone to remind us to get a good night’s sleep, to hit the grocery store instead of another night of take out, find our zone in a favorite workout, and to go do something fun. When my friends have reminded me of these type of actions and self-respect, I feel cared for and begin to re-detect a need for “balance”, whatever balance means in that moment.

I’m thankful for my friends, no matter how often or not often enough I have to see them, and however we are able to communicate (or on many occasions… not communicate, unfortunately.) Knowing the love of a friend picks us up, and it can take a flight from BOS to MSP to remind us of how good life really is. Hearing a “thank you” or a laugh or a “love ya”, whether in real time or in our hearts, can carry us forward and remind us what is important in life and to us in all aspects of each of our lives, including goals and aspirations in all arenas. Friends provide support for our professional selves, or a break away from it. Be sure to cherish and cultivate your friendships, for it leads to happiness, confidence, and success if you let it.

16 Reasons Why Planning a Wedding is an Exercise in Project Management

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Wedding planning came naturally to me, probably because I had years of experience developing the tools needed to be successful. I’ve been managing projects and teams since college at WPI, where team projects are a significant component of the curriculum. It made for a great transition to the working world, where EVERYTHING was seemingly project based. I moved from engineering, to construction, to real estate, and all along the way there were teams to be on and teams and projects to manage.  

And then, he asked the question. Of course, the answer was yes! My then boyfriend became my then fiance and now, for the past seven months and forever going forward, my husband. Planning the wedding was actually pretty fun even if there were some stressful times.

If planning or project management does not come naturally to you, I can understand that being a bride can be terrifying. This is especially so if you don’t hire a professional wedding planner. There are a lot of people to keep happy, funding to manage with a budget that is never what you really need or want, family politics instead of office or company politics, competing priorities, a million logistics to manage, and all this is on top of needing excellent communication skills.

    1. Leadership. Who else runs the show besides the bride for a wedding? It takes leadership to convey the vision, bring everyone together, and drive for success with a great start to the marriage. As the bride or groom, you are the leader and setting the tone with expectations and the grand vision for everyone in your wedding (see #4!). And this naturally brings us to…
    2. Setting goals. Remembering that the point of a wedding is to celebrate the joining of two hearts can help you focus on the why when times get stressful. Your goals may revolve around some of the other project management similarities below, or they may relate strictly to why you are doing this with your love. My husband and I wanted to have the most fun wedding – beautiful but not pretentious, simple but without lacking elegance. Oh, and on a budget!
    3. Communication. This is the penultimate skill needed in wedding planning! No one knows where to go, what to do, and how to behave unless you communicate your intent and needs. My awesome photographer was generous with praise for all of my communication leading up the wedding day (“can you teach other brides how to do this!?”). Who were the key contacts? What about back ups? Where do you need to be when? Similar to writing in elementary school, it is as simple as the 5 W’s and H, and telling it to the appropriate audience in the right manner. I liked email over text because it was easy to find – just search instead of scroll a million times (and no group texts!)
    4. Putting the team together. You don’t always have the ability to choose EVERYONE as part of a team when a project manager, but with a wedding you do get to select only the best people in your life and the vendors who can execute your vision! The wedding party, the person who presides over the ceremony, and the DJ are all your choice! However, freedom comes with great responsibility – who you select can make or break the planning and execution. Choose wisely! We were fortunate to get great recommendations and vendors who understood us. Our caterer felt like “our people” and the level of service was even better than we could have asked for. One of the leaders of our catering company was even helping me to bustle my dress before dinner!
    5. Establishing and sticking to a budget. My husband and I were focused on doing as much as we could for as little as possible; it was all about value for us. In fact, our theme was “ballin’ on a budget”! My parents were generous enough to help us shoulder the bulk of the costs and we had monthly budget update meetings. I would email them spreadsheets every time there was an update (back to communication!) and we would even hook up the computer via HDMI cable to the TV and have “budget presentations” to show progress. It helped us make decisions together, especially with the guest list.
    6. Negotiation.  This can be handy when working on a tight budget and dealing with family members. Asking for discounts or working through customization of packages and availability will be key. Sometimes, you may have to balance the guest list. “Sure, your co-worker can come, but this means that we are over the limit for the room. Who shouldn’t come instead?”.
    7. Logistics management. The day of takes significant planning and coordination before you get there! How are you getting to the venue? Where will you sleep after the reception? How will dinner or drinks be served? For every vendor hired and person involved, you need to think about how they are going to do their jobs and meet your vision. We had looked into alternate transportation options in case our January wedding in Massachusetts came with a side of snow – it would reduce the stress on everyone to get where they needed without worrying about their car sliding off the side of the road!
    8. Scheduling. Everything needs to be scheduled or it doesn’t happen! Understanding timelines and lead times and when the payments are due to make certain things happen are important. The day of needs to be carefully coordinated, and if you are already a project manager, you know everything will take longer than you think it will! Scheduling relates heavily to logistics management above.  I had created timelines for every vendor and “subgroup” of the wedding party – the bridesmaids are doing X at 10:00 am and the groomsmen are doing Y at 11:30am, the moms are with the bridesmaids, etc. It made for a much smoother day with fewer questions, especially repeating the task with vendors – who greatly appreciated being in the loop together!
    9. Coordination amongst teams. Your vendors and each of your families need some guidance on how to work together. They all have likely not worked with each other before, and you have to establish and facilitate how they work together and get their jobs done seamlessly and without affecting the other vendors negatively. Our venue event manager was a great coordinator and reached out to everyone. Since our DJ was dedicated into making sure we were on board with all of the music and timing, it was great that our event manager and the house manager had time to talk with him and work through decision making when we were in the middle of greeting guests at dinner.
    10. Managing differences. Maybe family politics does extend to politics – does your brother feel passionately about issues your partner’s cousin feels the exact opposite about, but just as passionately? You’ll need to figure out this management before they get to the bachelor party and work out getting the tuxes together! This is a huge communication piece, as well as expectation setting. We knew that picking the right guests to sit at tables together would be important to making the night fun for everyone. I set up the guest list in Excel for easy swapping and RSVP tracking and there was plenty of good times for both old friends and new friends.
    11. Organization. Whether you have a hard copy binder, or store everything in the cloud, you HAVE to stay organized with both wedding planning and project management. It doesn’t matter how you do it, but your documents, budget, and plans must be in a position to be understood if someone else picked up for us. My husband always had access to our guest list and budget and the logistics plans through Google Sheets (not an endorsement, just what I used!) – he never had to look beyond one file to understand where we were if there was a question and I wasn’t around.
    12. Risk management. For your outdoor wedding, you booked a tent in case of rain. This is risk management in practice – contingency plans, insurance policies, and checking in with the higher ups (whether a VP or mom and dad!) – all are a part of risk management. We’re trying to make sure things go smoothly and put in all the protections to make that possible. One way we managed our risk was to keep everything in a close proximity – the furthest distance was between the hotel and the church – one mile!
    13. Managing stress. There may be a lot on your plate, but freaking out or getting overwhelmed are not the solutions. It may be raising a hand to ask for help or taking some time out for sleep or a workout, whichever makes you happier. Stress only makes a situation worse – and stresses other people out. Keep your cool, and things will go fine. Sometimes you have to manage the stress of others too. My maid of honor was incredible at keeping everyone organized and calm – the other bridesmaids talked about how much easier she made their lives with color coded email reminders of what to bring and where to be, when.
    14. Task management. You didn’t pick your team or bridesmaids to sit there and say yes to all your ideas – you picked them to help you get the job done! This is practiced as delegation if you are passing your own tasks to someone else. Even if it is a task “out of your scope”, you need to make sure those willing (or being paid) to help are getting done what they need to, when they need to. My mom was a superstar helping out on the creative side of things, but we worked together on timelines to make sure we could balance all of our tasks and not be up to 5am before the wedding.
    15. Balancing priorities. I have a full-time job, and was also working full-time while wedding planning. While I do have a flexible employer, I have a lot to get done off hours because I have a demanding role and I do respect my employer. A few calls or emails at lunch and after work can get the job done, but I also know I could put off the honeymoon planning until we had the caterer booked. You don’t have to do it all once – nor should you!
    16. Patience. I don’t think this one needs explanation to either project managers or brides and grooms planning weddings! Take a breath – in, out – and it will be okay. Is it a battle worth fighting? We ended up fighting for supermarket flowers versus a typical florist because we loved the artistry of the woman who would be working on the wedding – and it paid off!  We saved over $2,000 versus a much simpler set of flowers of other vendors.

I’m not convinced that an employer would want to know about your wedding planning skills (unless you are going into events or wedding planning!), but development of project management skills via wedding planning can be directly applicable to what you are doing in the workplace! It might be a great example to use in an interview if you don’t have a work example to share.

I loved wedding planning and felt I did a great job for my and my husband’s wedding. At times I laughed because it felt similar to work in bringing teams together toward common goals and planning for a flawless execution. When more than a dozen guests told us it was one of the best weddings they had ever been to, it was gratifying to hear that all the hard work paid off not only for me, but for those in attendance. Now I need to continue to execute at work everyday!

Are you a project manager planning a wedding? Do you think the comparison is true for you too? Or does it relate to your career skills at all? Did everyone else love wedding planning?